Top Tips for Theory Test

/Top Tips for Theory Test
Top Tips for Theory Test 2017-09-13T15:09:07+00:00

Here is a few top tips to help get you on your way to passing the Theory Test…

I have been a Driving Instructor for 16 years and in recent times I have found more and more of my pupils struggling with passing their theory test. In fact, the pass rate for 2015/16 was as low as 47%, while in 2008/09 it was 66%.

However, if you follow these simple steps you should find yourself on the road to success without too much stress.

Revision Material

  • There is lots of revision material available. The highway code can be downloaded free here. The Official DVSA Theory Test for Car Drivers 2017 can be purchased in book form, as a DVD or can be downloaded as an App.
  • Be careful when purchasing Apps, especially if they are free, as some are better than others.

Practice

  • When you are out on the road with others watch out for road signs and markings.
  • Keep practicing. Try to be scoring full marks in mock tests before you go for the real thing.

On the day

  • You must bring both parts of your driving licence with you (picture). If you don’t have these with you, you won’t be allowed to sit your theory test.
  • Plan to arrive 15 minutes early.

Some test centres do not have convenient parking places.

When you arrive at the test centre you are provided with a locker to put your belongings in.

Part One: theory questions

The pass mark for the multiple choice questions is 43 out of 50.

  • Read the questions carefully. It can be a good idea to read them twice. You can flag any you are not sure of.
  • At the end read through all your answers again.

Part Two: Hazard Perception

After you finish Part One you can have a three-minute break before starting the Hazard Perception. You must stay in your seat during this time. There are 14 one-minute video clips that show various hazards as they develop. Thirteen of the clips will only have one hazard, but in one there will be two hazards to look out for.

  • Click the mouse when you see a hazard develop. You do not need to put the cursor on the hazard.

A hazard is anything that will make you, as the driver, change speed or direction.

  • The earlier you click the higher your score.

Provided by Ann McKiver ADI